Wall light is made from post-consumer plastic

a bathroom light with two light bulbs

A WALL light made from recycled post-consumer plastic has been developed by Sussex-based Spark & Bell.

The Emerald double-arm luminaire, which costs £247, is mounted on a panel made with recycled plastics.

The deep emerald base has light flecks creating a terrazzo mineral stone effect that offsets the brass arm and glowing opal shades.

It’s a compact fitting, running only 40cm from top to bottom, making it perfect for small spaces such as bathrooms.

The plastic used in the base is supplied by Ukraine-based firm, the Good Plastic Company.

Each Good Plastic pattern is made from just one type of plastic, so they are 100 per cent recyclable as well as being made from 100 per cent recycled material.

The company uses polystyrene (PS/HIPS), polypropylene (PP), polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene (LDPE, HDPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PETG), acrylic (PMMA) and ABS. It also can use mixed PE and PP.

The panels are water resistant, UV-resistant and rot-proof. PS and PETG panels can be certified for class B fire resistance. Other panels can be certified class E.

We offer panels of 1000x1000mm size and standard thicknesses of 10mm, 15mm, and 20mm. We can also produce panels with thicknesses from 5 to 40mm on demand.

The material can be machined, drilled, cut (CNC, woodworking sawblades, router and waterjet), sanded, heat formed, glued, and fixed with screws as well as adhesives.

The panels have medium to high scratch resistance depending on the material chosen.

The company says that it strives to have the lowest ecological footprint possible. Each panel is made from a single type of plastic so it can be easily recycled, extending its use indefinitely.

The firms is working to a zero-footprint manufacturing by using renewable energy and is aiming to reach a 100% material utilisation rate.

Ray Molony

Recolight Report is an independent guide to the latest developments in sustainable and circular lighting. Learn about the people, products, projects and processes that are shaping our industry’s low carbon future. Plus: explainers on the latest innovations, opinion from thought leaders and video interviews with leading disruptors. Edited by lighting expert, editor and industry figure Ray Molony.



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